Lidia Lopez Teaching the Art of Backstrap Loom Weaving

Lidia Lopez is a Mayan woman from Guatemala. She is very experienced weaving on a backstrap loom and teaches people from around the world the art of weaving. Here she is demonstrating the technique she uses to a group of visiting Americans and Japanese women.

A Guatemalan Family Cooking Pepian & Making Tortillas

This is a great example of a traditional Guatemalan household. The people in the video are Lidia Lopez and her family from San Antonio Aguas Calientes making Pepian and tortillas. They are dressed in ‘traje’ which is traditional clothing Mayan women have worn for centuries. This household is very indicative of many of the homes in Guatemala today.

Ixchel Museum of Indigenous Dress in Guatemala City, Guatemala

This is a museum dedicated to the indigenous dress of the Mayan people of Guatemala. It shows the history of weaving textiles and how the tradition dates back hundreds of years. Although times have changed, the art of backstrap loom weaving has survived and is prevalent in the Guatemalan culture today. It is important to the Maya heritage and to each individual’s social and ethnic identity. The woman standing at the top of the steps in this video is JoAnn Paulsen, founder of www.guatemalanhuipils.com.

Guatemalan Women Wearing ‘Tzutes’ and Holding Candles

Guatemalan Women With Tzutes

Tzutes are an important part of Mayan traditional dress. They are worn by both women and men and serve many purposes. They can be used as a shawl, for carrying babies or goods, covering food, or even for ceremonial purposes. Often you will see them folded up and worn on the head as to protect the wearer from the sun and so it is readily available to use if needed. Just like huipils, the tzute can help identify the user’s village by the bright colors and patterns. They are hand woven and vary in size and length.